Aaron A. King, Ph.D.

Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics
University of Michigan

Curriculum Vitae.

Education

Ph.D. (Applied Mathematics).
University of Arizona, 1999.
M.A. (Mathematics).
University of Hawai’i, 1992.
B.A. summa cum laude (Mathematics).
Rice University, 1989.

Appointments

  1. Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2016–.
  2. Professor of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2016–.
  3. Associate Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2011–2016.
  4. Associate Professor of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2011–2016.
  5. RAPIDD Research Fellow, Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in the Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 2008–2015.
  6. Primary Faculty Member of the Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2005–.
  7. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2005–2011.
  8. Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2005–2011.
  9. Research Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2004–2005.
  10. Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2002–2005.
  11. Visiting Research Assistant Professor of Mathematics. University of California, Davis, 2001–2002.
  12. National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Department of Environmental Science & Policy, University of California, Davis, 2000–2002. Mentor: Alan Hastings.
  13. Postdoctoral Research Associate. Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1999–2000. Mentor: J. M. Cushing.
  14. Graduate Research Associate. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, 1998.
  15. Flinn Foundation Fellow. Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1997–1998.
  16. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1994–1997.
  17. Adjunct Instructor of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1993–1994.
  18. Adjunct Instructor of Mathematics, Pima County Community College, Tucson, Arizona, 1993.
  19. Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Mathematics, University of Hawai’i, Manoa, 1991–1992.

Honors, Awards, and Recognitions

Scientific Leadership

Peer-reviewed Articles

  1. X. Du, A. A. King, R. J. Woods, and M. Pascual (2017) “Evolution-informed forecasting of seasonal influenza A (H3N2)” Sci. Transl. Med., in press.
  2. R. A. Smith, E. L. Ionides, and A. A. King (2017) “Infectious disease dynamics inferred from genetic data via sequential Monte Carlo” Mol. Biol. Evol. 34: 2065–2084.
  3. E. L. Ionides, C. Bretó, J. Park, R. A. Smith, and A. A. King (2017) “Monte Carlo profile confidence intervals for dynamic systems” J. R. Soc. Interface 14: 20170126.
  4. A. I. Bento, A. A. King, and P. Rohani (2017) “Maternal pertussis immunisation: clinical gains and epidemiological legacy” Eurosurveill. 22(15): 3.
  5. P. P. Martinez, R. C. Reiner Jr., M. Roy, B. A. Cash, Md. Yunus, A. S. G. Faruque, S. Huq, A. A. King, and M. Pascual (2017) “Cholera forecast for Dhaka, Bangladesh, with the 2016 El Niño: lessons learned” PLoS One: e0172355.
  6. T. Baracchini, A. A. King, M. J. Bouma, X. Rodó, E. Bertuzzo, and M. Pascual (2016) “Seasonality in cholera dynamics: A rainfall-driven model explains the wide range of patterns in endemic areas” Adv. Water Resour., in press.
  7. J. Perez-Saez, A. A. King, A. Rinaldo, Md. Yunus, and A. S. G. Faruque (2016) “Climate-driven endemic cholera is modulated by human mobility in a megacity” Adv. Water Resour., in press.
  8. P. P. Martinez, A. A. King, Md. Yunus, A. S. G. Faruque, and M. Pascual (2016) “Differential and enhanced response to climate forcing in diarrheal disease due to rotavirus across a megacity of the developing world” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 113: 4092–4097.
  9. A. A. King, D. Nguyen, and E. L. Ionides (2016) “Statistical inference for partially observed Markov processes via the R package pomp” J. Stat. Softw., 69(12): 1–43.
  10. M. Domenech de Cellès, F. M. G. Magpantay, A. A. King, and P. Rohani (2016) “The pertussis enigma: reconciling epidemiology, immunology, and evolution” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B, 283: 20152309.
  11. F. M. G. Magpantay, M. Domenech de Cellès, P. Rohani, and A. A. King (2015) “Pertussis immunity and epidemiology: mode and duration of vaccine-induced immunity” Parasitology, 143: 835–849.
  12. C. E. Cressler, M. A. Butler, and A. A. King (2015) “Detecting adaptive evolution in phylogenetic comparative analysis using the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model” Syst. Biol., 64: 953-968.
  13. M. Martinez-Bakker, A. A. King, and P. Rohani (2015) “Unraveling the Transmission Ecology of Polio” PLoS Biol., 13: e1002172.
  14. A. A. King, M. Domenech de Cellès, F. M. G. Magpantay, and P. Rohani (2015) “Avoidable errors in the modeling of outbreaks of emerging pathogens, with special reference to Ebola” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B, 282: 20150347.
  15. E. L. Ionides, D. Nguyen, Y. Atchadé, S. Stoev, and A. A. King (2015) “Inference for dynamic and latent variable models via iterated, perturbed Bayes maps” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 112: 719–724.
  16. F. M. G. Magpantay, M. A. Riolo, M. Domenech de Cellès, A. A. King, and P. Rohani (2014) “Epidemiological consequences of imperfect vaccines for immunizing infections” SIAM J. Appl. Math., 74: 1810–1830.
  17. S. Shrestha, O. N. Bjørnstad, and A. A. King (2014) “Evolution of acuteness in pathogen metapopulations: conflicts between ‘classical’ and invasion-persistence trade-offs” Theor. Ecol., 7: 299–311.
  18. A. Massey, A. A. King, and J. Foufopoulos (2014) “Fencing protected areas: a long-term assessment of the effects of reserve establishment and fencing on African mammalian diversity” Biol. Conserv., 176: 162–171.
  19. R. C. Reiner, Jr., S. T. Stoddard, B. M. Forshey, A. A. King, A. M. Ellis, A. L. Lloyd, K. C. Long, C. Rocha, S. Vilcarromero, H. Astete, I. Bazan, A. Lenhart, G. M. Vazquez-Prokopec, V. A. Paz-Soldan, P. J. McCall, U. Kitron, J. Elder, E. Halsey, A. Morrison, T. J. Kochel, and T. W. Scott (2014) “Time-varying, serotype-specific force of infection of dengue virus” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 111: E2694–E2702.
  20. M. Martinez-Bakker, K. Bakker, A. A. King, and P. Rohani (2014) “Human Birth Seasonality: Latitudinal Gradient and Interplay with Childhood Disease Dynamics” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B, 281: 20132438.
  21. M. Domenech de Cellès, M. A. Riolo, F. M. G. Magpantay, P. Rohani, and A. A. King (2014) “Epidemiological evidence for herd immunity induced by acellular pertussis vaccines” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 111: E716–E717.
  22. M. A. Riolo, A. A. King, and P. Rohani (2013), “Can vaccine legacy explain the British pertussis resurgence?” Vaccine, 31: 5903–5908.
  23. J. S. Lavine, A. A. King, V. Andreasen, and O. N. Bjørnstad (2013), “Immune boosting explains regime-shifts in prevaccine-era pertussis dynamics” PLoS ONE, 8: e72086.
  24. N. G. Reich, S. Shrestha, A. A. King, P. Rohani, J. Lessler, S. Kalayanarooj, I-K. Yoon, R. V. Gibbons, D. S. Burke, and D. A. T. Cummings (2013), “Interactions between serotypes of dengue highlight epidemiological impact of cross immunity” J. R. Soc. Interface, 10: 20130414.
  25. R. C. Reiner, Jr., A. A. King, M. Emch, Md. Yunus, A. S. G. Faruque, and M. Pascual (2012), “Highly localized sensitivity to climate forcing drives endemic cholera in a megacity”, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 109: 2033–2036.
  26. S. Shreshta, P. Rohani, and A. A. King (2011), “Statistical inference for multi-pathogen systems” PLOS Comput. Biol., 7:e1002135.
  27. E. L. Ionides, A. Bhadra, Y. Atchadé, and A. A. King (2011), “Iterated filtering” Ann. Stat., 39:1776–1802.
  28. J. Lavine, A. A. King, and O. N. Bjørnstad (2011), “Natural immune boosting in pertussis dynamics and the potential for long-term vaccine failure” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108:7259–7264.
  29. P. Rohani, X. Zhong, and A A. King (2010), “Contact network structure explains the changing epidemiology of pertussis” Science, 330:982–985.
  30. P. Rohani and A. A. King (2010), “Never mind the length, feel the quality: The impact of long-term epidemiological data sets on theory, application, and policy” Trends Ecol. Evol., 25:611–618.
  31. C. E. Cressler, A. A. King, and E. E. Werner (2010), “Interactions between behavioral and life history tradeoffs in the evolution of integrated predator-defense plasticity” Am. Nat., 176:276–288.
  32. J. L. Zelner, A. A. King, C. L. Moe, and J. N. S. Eisenberg (2010) “How infections propagate after point source outbreaks: An analysis of secondary norovirus transmission” Epidemiology, 21:711–718.
  33. J. Vandermeer and A. A. King (2010), “Consequential classes of resources: Subtle global bifurcation with dramatic ecological consequences in a simple population model” J. Theor. Biol., 263:237–241.
  34. E. C. Farrer, D. E. Goldberg, and A. A. King (2010), “Time lags and the balance of positive and negative interactions in driving grassland community dynamics” Am. Nat., 175:160–173.
  35. D. He, E. L. Ionides, and A. A. King (2010), “Plug-and-play inference for disease dynamics: Measles in large and small towns as a case study” J. R. Soc. Interface, 7: 271–283.
  36. A. A. King, S. Shrestha, E. T. Harvill, and O. N. Bjørnstad (2009), “Evolution of acute infections and the invasion-persistence trade-off” Am. Nat., 173: 446–455.
  37. J. A. Scales, A. A. King, and M. A. Butler (2009), “Running for your life or running for your dinner: What drives fiber-type evolution in lizard locomotor muscles?” Am. Nat., 173:543–553.
  38. C. Bretó, D. He, E. L. Ionides, and A. A. King (2009), “Time series analysis via mechanistic models” Ann. Appl. Stat., 3:319–348.
  39. H. D. G. Maschner, M. W. Betts, J. Cornell, J. A. Dunne, B. Finney, N. Huntly, J. W. Jordan, A. A. King, N. Misarti, K. L. Reedy-Maschner, R. Russell, A. Tews, S. A. Wood, and B. Benson (2009) “An Introduction to the Biocomplexity of Sanak Island, Western Gulf of Alaska” Pacific Sci., 63:673–709.
  40. A. A. King, E. L. Ionides, M. Pascual, and M. J. Bouma (2008), “Inapparent infections and cholera dynamics”, Nature 454:877–880.
  41. D. Dimitrov, A. A. King, and T. G. Hallam (2008), “Modeling evolution and persistence of neurological viral diseases in wild populations”. Math. Biosci. Eng. 5:729–741.
  42. E. L. Ionides, C. Bretó, and A. A. King (2006), “Inference for nonlinear dynamical systems” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103:18438–18443.
  43. R. A. Desharnais, R. F. Costantino, J. M. Cushing, S. M. Henson, B. Dennis, and A. A. King (2006), “Experimental support of the scaling rule for demographic stochasticity” Ecol. Lett. 9:537–547.
  44. R. F. Costantino, R. A. Desharnais, J. M. Cushing, B. Dennis, S. M. Henson, and A. A. King (2005), “Nonlinear population dynamics: The flour beetle Tribolium as an effective tool of discovery” Advances in Ecological Research 37:101–141.
  45. Marguerite Butler and A. A. King (2004), “Phylogenetic comparative analysis: a modeling approach for adaptive evolution”, Am. Nat. 164:683–695.
  46. A. A. King, R. F. Costantino, J. M. Cushing, S. M. Henson, R. A. Desharnais, and B. Dennis (2004), “Anatomy of a chaotic attractor: subtle model-predicted patterns revealed in population data” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101:408–413.
  47. A. A. King and Alan Hastings (2003), “Spatial mechanisms for coexistence of species with a shared natural enemy”, Theor. Pop. Biol. 64: 431–438.
  48. Shandelle M. Henson, A. A. King, R. F. Costantino, J. M. Cushing, Brian Dennis, and Robert A. Desharnais (2003), “Explaining and predicting patterns in stochastic population systems”, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 270: 1549–1553.
  49. A. A. King, R. A. Desharnais, S. M. Henson, R. F. Costantino, and J. M. Cushing (2002), “Random Perturbations and Lattice Effects in Chaotic Population Dynamics”, Science 297:2163.
  50. S. M. Henson, R. F. Costantino, J. M. Cushing, Robert A. Desharnais, Brian Dennis, and A. A. King (2001), “Lattice Effects Observed in Chaotic Dynamics of Experimental Populations”, Science 294:602-605.
  51. A. A. King and W. M. Schaffer (2001), “The Geometry of a Population Cycle: A Mechanistic Model of Snowshoe Hare Demography”, Ecology 82:814–830.
  52. W. M. Schaffer, B. S. Pederson, K. Moore, O. Skarpaas, A. A. King, and T. V. Bronnikova (2001), “Subharmonic resonance and multi-annual oscillations in northern mammals: a nonlinear dynamical systems perspective”, Chaos, Solitons, Fractals 12:251–264.
  53. J. M. Cushing, S. M. Henson, R. A. Desharnais, B. Dennis, R. F. Costantino, and A. King (2001), “A Chaotic Attractor in Ecology: Theory and Experimental Data”, Chaos, Solitons, Fractals 12:219–234.
  54. A. A. King and W. M. Schaffer (1999), “The Rainbow Bridge: Hamiltonian Limits and Resonance in Predator Prey Dynamics”, J. Math. Biol. 39:439–469.
  55. A. A. King, W. M. Schaffer, J. Treat, C. Gordon, and M. Kot (1996), “Weakly Dissipative Predator-Prey Systems”, Bull. Math. Biol. 58:835–860.

Abstracts and preprints are available on my website. My ORCID is 0000-0001-6159-3207 and my ResearcherID is B-8092-2012. My Google Scholar profile is here.

Book chapters

  1. E. L. Ionides, C. Bretó, and A. A. King (2008), “Modeling disease dynamics: Cholera as a case study”, Chapter 8 in A. Biswas, S. Datta, J. Fine, M. Segal (eds.) Statistical Advances in Biomedical Sciences.
  2. A. A. King (2005), “Phase plane”, in Alwyn Scott (ed.), Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science, pp. 712–714. Routledge, New York.
  3. A. A. King and A. C. Scott (1998), “The Dimensions of Creativity”, in S. R. Hameroff, A. W. Kaszniak, & A. C. Scott (eds.) Toward a Science of Consciousness 2, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass.

Technical Reports

  1. A. Becker and A. A. King (2014), “Biases in statistical inference: measles as a case study”, University of Michigan, Applied & Interdisciplinary Mathematics Program.
  2. E. L. Ionides, C. Bretó, and A. A. King (2006), “Parameter estimation for nonlinear state space models”, Statistics Department Technical Report #438. University of Michigan, Department of Statistics.

Research Funding

  1. National Institutes of Health, U54. “X-raying high-dimensional infectious disease data using statistical inference”, Part of Center for Inference & Dynamics of Infectious Disease, a Center of Excellence of the Models of Infectious Disease Agents (MIDAS) network 2014–2019. Participating Investigator with Specified Effort. $3.0M.
  2. National Institutes of Health, R01. “Integrating immunology, epidemiology, and evolution to understand and control pertussis transmission”, 2012–2017. PI. Award of $1.7M.
  3. Research and Policy for Infectious Disease Dynamics (RAPIDD) Program Interagency Personnel Agreement, 2008–2012. National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center and Department of Homeland Security, Science & Technology Directorate.
  4. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Grant: “Cholera prediction: the role of the oceans and nonlinear disease dynamics”, 2008–2011. Oceans and Human Health Program. Co-PI. Award of $943k.
  5. National Science Foundation, Division of Environmental Biology Grant: “Collaborative Research: A Direct Modeling Approach for Phylogenetic Comparative Analysis”, 2005–2010. Systematics Program. PI. Award of $361k.
  6. National Science Foundation, Division of Biological Sciences Grant: “Collaborative Research: The interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic factors in epidemiological dynamics: cholera as a case study”, 2004–2008. Ecology of Infectious Diseases Program. Co-PI. Award of $942,000.
  7. National Science Foundation, Division of Biological Sciences Grant: “Ecological Influences on Rabies Infections in Bats”, 2004–2006. Ecology of Infectious Diseases Program. Co-PI. Award of $1.5M.
  8. National Science Foundation Mathematical Science Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, 2000–2003. Award of $90k.
  9. National Science Foundation Biological Informatics Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (refused), 2000. Award of $100k.
  10. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, 1994–1997.

Teaching Grants

  1. National Science Foundation, Division of Mathematical Sciences Grant: ’UBM-Institutional: SUBMERGE—Supplying Undergraduate Biology and Mathematics Education and Research Group Experiences to Students at the University of Michigan’, 2006–2011. Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biology & Mathematics Program. Co-investigator and participating faculty. Award of $905,000.

Invited Lectures

  1. Plenary Address, Workshop on Distributed Data for Dynamics and Manifolds, Casa Matemática Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico (4 September 2017).
  2. Workshop on New Perspectives on State Space Models, Casa Matemática Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico (30 August 2017).
  3. Conference on Mathematical Modeling and Control of Communicable Diseases, Fundação Getulio Vargas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (12 January 2016).
  4. RAPIDD Workshop on Gravity Models, Disease Spread, and Spatial Scales, Queens’ College, Cambridge, England (8 September 2015).
  5. Workshop on Statistics and Nonlinear Dynamics in Biology and Medicine, Banff International Research Station, Banff, Alberta (29 July 2014).
  6. Statistical and Mathematical Modeling in Biological Applications (SaMMBA) Seminar, Institut Pasteur, Paris (6 May 2014).
  7. Course on Modeling of Infectious Diseases, Institut Pasteur, Paris (5 May 2014).
  8. Program in Applied Mathematics 35th Anniversary Meeting, Tucson, Arizona (26 April 2014).
  9. Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Honors Society, University of Michigan (26 March 2014).
  10. Statistical Society of Canada Annual Meeting, Guelph, Ontario (4 June 2012).
  11. Global Environmental Changes and Health, Ecole des Hautes Études en Santé Publique, Paris, (4 November 2011).
  12. National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) Catalysis Meeting “Evolution of Infectious Diseases: Integrating Empirical Data and Modeling Approaches”, Durham, North Carolina (23 March 2011).
  13. University of Michigan Society of Biology Students, Ann Arbor (19 January 2011).
  14. Plenary Address, Opening Workshop for the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) Program on Analysis of Object Data, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (13 September 2010).
  15. Keynote Address, Symposium on Advances in Modelling Ecological Data, British Ecological Society Annual Meeting, University of Leeds (8 September 2010).
  16. Symposium on Stochastic Dynamics in Population Biology, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Conference on the Life Sciences, Pittsburgh (15 July 2010).
  17. Workshop on Statistical Methods for Dynamic System Models, Vancouver, British Columbia (6 June 2009).
  18. Plenary Address, Ecology & Evolution of Infectious Disease Conference, University of Georgia (22 May 2009).
  19. Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Populations in Biological Systems Conference, Tucson, Arizona (5 October 2007).
  20. Bridging the Scales of Disease Dynamics 2006, Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (29 September 2006).
  21. Keynote Address, TIMBER 2005, A Conference on Quantitative Biology, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina (4 November 2005).
  22. Symposium, Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Montréal, Québec, (12 August 2005).
  23. Symposium, SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamical Systems, Snowbird, Utah (26 May 2005).
  24. Joint Mathematics Meetings, Atlanta, Georgia (8 January 2005).
  25. Joint Mathematics Meetings, Phoenix, Arizona (7 January 2004).
  26. University of Tennessee Chapter of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (5 November 2003).
  27. Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Savannah, Georgia, (7 August 2003).
  28. Rocky Mountain Mathematics Consortium Summer Conference, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, (7–18 July 2003).
  29. Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Tucson, Arizona (4 August 2002).
  30. Mathematical Methods in Population Biology, University of California, Davis (2000–2001).

Seminars

  1. Laboratory for Pediatric Infectious Disease, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands (7 October 2016).
  2. Theoretical Biology, Institut für Integrative Biologie, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich (3 October 2016)
  3. Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Pennsylvania State University (10 December 2015).
  4. Quantitative Biology, Program in Applied Mathematics, Tucson, Arizona (22 April 2014).
  5. Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut (3 April 2014).
  6. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University (4 April 2013).
  7. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (6 December 2012).
  8. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique & Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France (14 October 2011).
  9. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston (25 April 2011).
  10. Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Pennsylvania State University (21 April 2011).
  11. Biological Physics and Complex Systems Series, University of Michigan (22 February 2010).
  12. Department of Physics, Oakland University (17 September 2009).
  13. Department of Ecology & Evolution, University of Chicago (9 February 2009).
  14. Mathematical and Computational Biology Series, Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley (17 September 2008).
  15. National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara, California (6 December 2007).
  16. Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (17 October 2007).
  17. Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (23 February 2007).
  18. Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (24 January 2007).
  19. W. K. Kellogg Biological Station (13 January 2006).
  20. Program in Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (28 October 2005).
  21. Differential Equations, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee (28 October 2002).
  22. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, (19 January 1999).

Contributed Lectures

  1. “An Epidemiological Perspective on the Generation and Maintenance of Immune Memory”, Lecture, RAPIDD Workshop on Generation and Maintenance of Immune Memory, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (7 March 2011)
  2. “Boosting of acquired immunity through re-exposure: Dynamical consequences”, Lecture, Ecology Society of America Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico (6 August 2009)
  3. “Statistical inference using mechanistic models in continuous time: Measles as a case study”, Lecture, Ecology Society of America Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (7 August 2008)
  4. “New insights into cholera dynamics: Rapid loss of immunity, transmission mode, and climate drivers”, Lecture, Ecology Society of America Annual Meeting, San Jose, California (9 August 2007)
  5. “A new view of cholera endemicity: routes of transmission and rapid loss of immunity”, Lecture, Ecology of Infectious Diseases and American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene, Atlanta, Georgia (21 November 2006).
  6. “Multiple skeletons and lattice effects in stochastic population models”, Lecture, Alcalá Second International Conference on Mathematical Ecology, Alcalá de Henares, Spain (5–9 September 2003).
  7. “Spatial Mechanisms for Coexistence of Species Sharing a Common Natural Enemy”, Lecture, Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Tucson, Arizona (4–9 August 2002).
  8. “Subtle Temporal Patterns in Tribolium Population Dynamics”, Lecture, International Conference on Mathematical and Theoretical Biology, Hilo, Hawai’i (16–19 July 2001).
  9. “Genesis of Spatio-Temporal Pattern: A Codimension-Three Bifurcation in a Spatial Predator-Prey Model”, Poster Presentation, International Conference on Mathematical and Theoretical Biology, Hilo, Hawai’i (16–19 July 2001).
  10. “Host-parasitoid dynamics, apparent competition, and spatio-temporal pattern”, Seminar, Institute for Theoretical Dynamics, University of California, Davis (9 May 2001).
  11. “Hamiltonian Limits and Subharmonic Resonance in Ecological Models: From the Pendulum to the Lynx and the Hare”, Symposium Lecture, AMS Western Sectional Meeting, Tucson, Arizona (14 November 1998).
  12. “Subharmonic Resonance and Population Cycles”, Seminar, Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona (1 & 8 April 1998).
  13. “Elucidating the Microcircuitry Underlying Polyphasic Response to Olfactory Stimulation”, Lecture and Poster, Flinn Foundation Biomedical Initiative Symposium, Tucson, Arizona (9–10 May 1997).
  14. “Using Mathematics to Sniff Out the Brain’s Olfactory Code”, Lecture, Quantitative Modeling in Biology Seminar Series, University of Arizona, (26 February 1997).
  15. “Persistent Remnants of Hamiltonian Topology in Predator-Prey Dynamics”, Lecture, Dynamics Days Arizona Conference (8–11 January 1997).
  16. “Mathematical Modeling as a Tool in Neurophysiology”, Lecture, Foundation Biomedical Initiative Symposium, Scottsdale, Arizona (3–4 May 1996).
  17. “The Dimensions of Creativity”, Lecture, Toward A Science of Consciousness II Conference (8–13 April 1996).

University Courses

  1. Mathematics of Life: An Introduction to Quantitative Biology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2017.
  2. Model-based Statistical Inference in Ecology. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2016.
  3. Mathematics of Life: An Introduction to Quantitative Biology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2016.
  4. Mathematical Ecology. Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2015.
  5. Model-based Statistical Inference in Ecology. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2014.
  6. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2014.
  7. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2013.
  8. Population and Community Ecology. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2012.
  9. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2012.
  10. Model-based Statistical Inference for Ecological and Epidemiological Dynamics. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term 2012.
  11. Mathematical Ecology. Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2011.
  12. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2010.
  13. Interrogating Data with Models, Graduate Course, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2010.
  14. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2009.
  15. Mathematical Ecology. Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2009.
  16. Interrogating Data with Models, Graduate Course, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2008.
  17. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2007.
  18. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Winter term, 2007.
  19. Mathematical Ecology. Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2006.
  20. General Ecology. Program in Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Fall term, 2005.
  21. Mathematical Ecology. Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2004–2005.
  22. Mathematical Ecology. Departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2003–2004.
  23. Introduction to Modeling in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior. Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2003.
  24. Integral Calculus. Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, 2002.
  25. Ordinary Differential Equations. Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, 2002.
  26. Calculus. Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1996.
  27. Calculus (with Laboratory). Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1994.
  28. Calculus (with Laboratory). Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 1993.
  29. College Algebra. Pima County Community College, Tucson, Arizona, 1993.
  30. Elementary Mathematics. Pima County Community College, Tucson, Arizona, 1993.
  31. Trigonometry. Department of Mathematics, University of Hawai’i, Manoa, 1992.
  32. Trigonometry. Department of Mathematics, University of Hawai’i, Manoa, 1991.
  33. Calculus. Department of Mathematics, University of Hawai’i, Manoa, 1991.

Short Courses

  1. Simulation-based Inference for Epidemiological Dynamics. 9th Summer Institute in Statistics and Modeling in Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, 12–14 July 2017.
  2. Workshop on Mathematical Models of Climate Variability, Environmental Change and Infectious Diseases. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy 8–19 May 2017.
  3. Simulation-based Inference for Epidemiological Dynamics. 8th Summer Institute in Statistics and Modeling in Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, 18–20 July 2016.
  4. Model-based Inference in Ecology and Epidemiology. Spring College on the Physics of Complex Systems, Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, 9–20 May 2016.
  5. Simulation-based Inference for Epidemiological Dynamics. 7th Summer Institute in Statistics and Modeling in Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, 15–17 July 2015.
  6. School on Pathogen Dynamics, Climate, and Global Change. International Centre for Theoretical Physics/South American Institute for Fundamental Research (ICTP-SAIFR), São Paulo, Brazil, 12–23 January 2015.
  7. Workshop on Mathematical Models of Climate Variability, Environmental Change, & Infectious Diseases, Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, 29 April–3 May 2013.
  8. Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Workshop, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 19–22 May 2012.
  9. Abdus Salam ICTP Workshop on Infectious Diseases, Nelson Mandela African Institute of Science & Technology, Arusha, Tanzania, 23–30 January 2012.
  10. Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Workshop, University of California, Santa Barbara, 22–25 June 2011.
  11. Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Workshop, University of Georgia, Athens, 16–19 May 2009.
  12. Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Workshop, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, 1–4 June, 2008.

Secondary School Courses

  1. General Biology. Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, Arizona, 1993.
  2. Art History. Varsity International School, Honolulu, Hawai’i, 1992.
  3. English. Varsity International School, Honolulu, Hawai’i, 1991–1992.

Postdoctoral researchers supervised

  1. Carles Bretó (2015–)
  2. Masoud Mirmomeni (2015–2016)
  3. Matthieu Domenech de Cellès (2013–2015)
  4. Felicia G. Magpantay (2013–2015)
  5. Jennie S. Lavine (2011–2013)
  6. Robert C. Reiner (2010–2011)
  7. Sourya Shrestha (2009–2012)
  8. Daihai He (2006–2008)

Graduate students supervised

  1. Richard (Alex) Smith (Ph.D. candidate in Bioinformatics, University of Michigan)
  2. Micaela Martinez-Bakker (Ph.D., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 2015)
  3. Daniel Jonas (M.S. Applied Mathematics, University of Michigan, 2013)
  4. Laura Helmkamp (M.S., Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 2012)
  5. Clayton Cressler (Ph.D., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 2010)
  6. Melissa Brady (M.S., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 2010)
  7. Kevin Hannay (Applied & Interdisciplinary Mathematics, University of Michigan, 2009–2010)
  8. Yancy Lo (M.S., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 2009)
  9. Sourya Shrestha (Ph.D., Applied Interdisciplinary Mathematics, University of Michigan, 2009)
  10. Frank Wright, (M.A., Mathematics, University of Tennessee, 2005)

Graduate student advisory committee service

  1. J. T. McCrone (Microbiology & Immunology, University of Michigan)
  2. Pamela Martinez (Ecology & Evolution, University of Chicago)
  3. Clara Shaw (EEB, University of Michigan)
  4. Byron Smith (EEB, University of Michigan)
  5. Kevin Bakker (EEB, University of Michigan)
  6. Daniel Zinder (Ph.D., Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, 2015)
  7. Maria Riolo (Ph.D., Applied Interdisciplinary Mathematics, University of Michigan, 2014)
  8. Andres Baeza (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2013)
  9. Edward Baskerville (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2013)
  10. David Allen (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2012)
  11. Susanna Messinger (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2012)
  12. Jennie Lavine (Ph.D. in Biology, Pennsylvania State University, 2011)
  13. Joseph Brown (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2010)
  14. Anindya Bhadra, (Ph.D. in Statistics, University of Michigan, 2010)
  15. Sarah Cobey (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2009)
  16. Diego Ruiz-Moreno (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Michigan, 2009)
  17. Carles Bretó, (Ph.D. in Statistics, University of Michigan, 2007)
  18. Mimi Lin (EEB, Duke University)
  19. Sean McMahon (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Tennessee, 2006)
  20. Tadashi Fukami (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Tennessee, 2003)
  21. Paula Federico (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Tennessee, 2007)
  22. Marc Cadotte (Ph.D. in EEB, University of Tennessee, 2006)
  23. Wandi Ding (Ph.D. in Mathematics, University of Tennessee, 2006)

Undergraduate research experiences supervised

  1. Diane Wang (Honors Thesis in Biology, University of Michigan , 2013–2014)
  2. Alexander Becker (Mathematics, New York University, Summer REU, 2014)
  3. Samuel Bouma (Physics, Trinity College, Dublin, Summer REU, 2012)
  4. Busola Ruth Alabi (Biology, South Carolina State University, Summer REU, 2011)

Professional Societies

Software Development

Developer and maintainer of the following software packages:

These can be downloaded from my website.

Academic Service


© 2017 Aaron A. King
2051 Kraus Natural Sciences Building
830 North University Avenue
Ann Arbor MI 48109-1048 USA